3 Apr 2017 Poland Meetings Impact - Understanding the value of the Meeting Industry
The Poland Meetings Impact 2015 study showcased the economic contribution of the meetings industry. The organization of meetings and events in 2015 generated 1% of GDP and an economic input at the level of 26 billion PLN. The goal of the study implemented as part of the Wpływ ekonomiczny przemysłu spotkań na gospodarkę Polski – Poland Meetings Impact 2015 (The Economic Impact of Poland’s Meetings Industry - Poland Meetings Impact 2015) project was to define the economic significance of the meetings and events held in Poland and demonstrate their economic contribution. In other words, the substantive scope encompassed economic aspects connected with the industry’s impact on the national economy in reference to essential indicators, i.e. value added, GDP and employment. The project’s three-stage analysis examined three groups of stakeholders: participants, organisers of meetings and events and venue administrators. The goal was achieved thanks to the collected data and an econometric model based on the data of the Central Statistical Office of Poland, built specifically to determine the meetings industry’s impact on national economy. “The research estimated the meetings industry’s contribution to GDP at the level of 1%. In 2015 meetings and events generated approx. 26 billion PLN for Poland’s economy and approx. 12 billion PLN of gross value added. More than 12 million domestic and international participants attended the meetings and events, which on average lasted two days. The meetings industry’s employment contribution amounted to 171,000”, sums up Dr Krzysztof Celuch, Vice-Rector of the Warsaw School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Manager of Poland Convention Bureau POT and head of the project The Wpływ ekonomiczny przemysłu spotkań na gospodarkę Polski – Poland Meetings Impact 2015 report was compiled by a team of researchers and industry experts working under the auspices of Meeting Professionals International Poland Chapter and Poland Convention Bureau POT, in cooperation with regional convention bureaux from Poland, venues hosting meetings and events, as well as meeting organisers. It is Poland’s very first publication of this kind and eighth in the world. “The report covered pioneering research on the meetings industry’s impact on the economies of select countries, presented and sorted out terminology issues, as well as profiled Poland’s meetings sector. I am very glad that cooperation with MPI Foundation made all of this possible”, comments Agnieszka Faracik-Leśniak, President of MPI Poland Chapter.  Written by MPI Poland Chapter Project organisers: Meeting Professionals International Poland Chapter, Poland Convention Bureau Polska Organizacja Turystyczna, MPI Foundation  Project’s technological partner: Z-factor  Report’s publication partner: Lubelskie Centrum Konferencyjne (Lublin Conference Centre) ...
20 Mar 2017 Medical Meetings F&B – Food and Beverage, or Frustrate and Bewilder?
The term F&B in the meetings industry refers to food and beverage. When it comes to medical meetings F&B, I like to use the term to “frustrate and bewilder” instead. Since the passage of the Physicians Payment Sunshine Act in 2010 (which was renamed to the National Physician Payment Transparency Program: Open Payments Act in 2013), reporting transparency of spend in the category of “F&B – meals” has not gotten any easier. In fact, with 88 countries now having some type of healthcare spend track reporting, it has gotten even more complicated. Why is medical meetings F&B so difficult? Every country has a different set of rules and every manufacturer (pharmaceutical, medical device, biopharma, biologic) has their own set of limits and caps. Many countries set medical meetings F&B limits using the term “reasonable.” However, there is no definition or standard for the term “reasonable.” Many planners find it difficult to work within medical meetings meal caps for F&B, especially when healthcare professionals (HCPs) attending from different countries may be subject to different requirements. Working with medical meal caps is a problem when using various meeting destinations as prices vary dramatically among 1st, 2nd, 3rd tier destinations.   MPI has a certificate program to tame the frustration and bewilderment of medical meetings. With MPI's Healthcare Meeting Compliance Certificate you'll learn to navigate the ins and outs of medical meetings and events successfully.  Register for a live or on demand class. How do medical meetings F&B reporting requirements vary by country? Medical meetings F&B expenses must be reported in the United States. The U.S. Congress passed the Open Payments Act (OPA) as part of the Affordable Care Act to shed light on financial relationships between drug and medical device manufacturers and doctors. Why?  The OPA enables patients to make better and informed decisions when choosing HCPs and deciding about treatments. The law also is meant to deter inappropriate financial relationships that might lead to increased healthcare costs. Medical meetings F&B reporting is not required in Europe. The Disclosure Act led by the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA) does not require any F&B reporting of transfer of value from a manufacturer to an HCP. Meeting Professional International’s European Meetings & Events Conference (EMEC) started with a distinctly Spanish flavor and culminated with a taste of Italy. The three-day conference devoted to education, networking and business opportunities was all about passion, spirit and inspiration—or duende, as the Spaniards say—and it was indeed a fitting tribute to the success of the event. Why?  One simple reason – EFPIA did not think they could handle the administration of calculating these expenses. What does the PhRMA code say about medical meetings meal caps and reporting? Many companies follow the PhRMA code for their hotel and meal limitations. However, according to John Buchanan, reconciling those relatively longstanding, but vague, ethical guidelines with the new requirements under the OPA wreaked havoc for pharmaceutical companies and their meeting planners. Although there are no formal rules under either PhRMA guidelines, concerns about optics have historically forced pharma companies to set strict and conservative limits on the amounts of money they can spend on hotel rooms, meals and other costs, such as transportation. Today, OPA — which requires detailed reporting on a public website of every “transfer of value” to a doctor or other HCP who attends a meeting paid for by the pharma company — has led to even more conservative limitations on spending. However, the great irony is that like PhRMA, OPA does not have any clear limits for medical meetings meal caps. Each pharmaceutical company sets its own limits – generally based on an abstract formula that includes PhRMA’s broad ethical guidelines, the specific reporting requirements of OPA, and sensitivity to optics. What’s next for medical meetings meal caps and F&B reporting? Unless there is a global set of standards that’s adapted and shared with all countries, the likelihood of simpler F&B reporting will not get any easier any time soon. Frustrating and bewildering, indeed! Written by Pat Schaumann - This story originally appeared on the Maritz Travel Blog on February 24, 2017.  Attend next HMCC class at IMEX Frankfurt - Monday 15 May @IMEX ...
13 Mar 2017 MPI Turkey Chapter at Ace of Mice Istanbul
MPI Turkey Chapter was among the exhibitors of the Ace of Mice by Turkish Airlines 2017 edition and also moderated the Main Session of the Exhibition. MPI Turkey Chapter President Elif Balcı Fisunoglu was the moderator of the main session of the exhibition; “Mice Professional are Gathering to Build the Future”. The leading names of the international Meeting and incentive industry; Martin Sirk, CEO of ICCA, Marta Gomes, ICCA Board Member, Rajeev Kohli, SITE Global President and Harry Fine President of Harry Fine Associates gathered to share their experiences, problems and success stories for the future of the industry and Turkish meeting industry. MPI Turkey President Elif Balcı Fisunoglu shared some of the figures of the MPI International Future of Meetings white paper with the audience and show it as a very valuable survey for understanding more about the future of the meeting industry. At her closing speech she underlined that; “The political forces will shape the future obviously. Meetings are necessary to solve problems of political instability, so we will still be involved in them. As MPI, we say when we meet we change the world. We will continue to meet to change the world. And we would like to meet and the change the world here in Istanbul.” She also quoted;  “Turkey did a great work over the last 20 years in the global meetings industry and has a strong brand and professional reputation. Turkey is in a region always with opportunities and challenges and in the past we were very successful in turning the challenges as advantages and became not only a leader in the region but also a very important player in the whole world. We need to think about what steps can be taken to safeguard that brand for the next 20 years and keep the business environment strong and efficient.” MPI Turkey Chapter members and sector professionals gathered at the MPI Turkey Reception held at MPI stand on the first day of the exhibition. MPI Turkey Chapter President Elif Balcı Fisunoglu, President Elect Handan Boyce, Immediate Past President Ibrahim Keskin, Vice Presidents Feyhan Kapralı, Hasan Eker and Bulent Ergan welcomed the guests representing local sector and corporate professionals associations from Turkey. As the Industry Supporter of Ace of Mice, MPI Turkey represented an appreciation plaque at the colisng ceremony held on 24 February and MPI Turkey Vice Presidents Bulent Ergan and Hasan Eker recived the plaque from Volkan Ataman the President of Ace of Mice.    Written by Elif Balci Fisunoglu - MPI Turkey President...
27 Feb 2017 Latest MPI Meeting Outlook winter edition
MPI’s latest quarterly Meeting Outlook survey, conducted in November, found that the rate of growth in the meeting and event industry is slowing slightly. While 58 percent of respondents projected favorable business conditions for the coming year, that figure declined from 67 percent in August. There are now some indications that the market isn’t strictly a seller’s or buyer’s market, says Bill Voegeli (MPI Georgia Chapter), president of Association Insights, the Atlanta-area research firm that conducts the survey. Instead, a level of equilibrium is being realized in the industry. "It is a good place to be," Voegeli says. "A balanced market is a little more comfortable." Nonetheless, meeting planners and organizers must stay on their toes, with budgets cooling off. "More than ever, they are doing more with less, and there is a focus on ROI," he says. "That is pretty normal in markets where it feels like budgets are tight and expectations are high." "Most of our clients have been going ahead with every event they have on their books," says Tim Neill (MPI Oregon Chapter), sales manager of AV Rental Services, a division of Henry V Events in the Portland area. "We’re having to hire more people, both freelancers and contract labor and full-time employees. We have more work than we have seen in a long time." Although corporate meetings showed the greatest projected growth of all types of meetings in the survey, there are many signs that organizers are being cautious about spending decisions. Linda Nelson, CMP (MPI Carolinas Chapter), owner of To Plan Ahead, a full-service meeting planning firm in Asheville, N.C., that specializes in technical meetings and conferences, has, for instance, seen more of her corporate clients taking meetings in-house. One had previously disbanded its meetings department and was outsourcing all of its meetings. "All I can think of is maybe they are better able to manage the logistics when everything is in-house—even when it’s costing them more because they have to pay benefits," Nelson says. "It’s just one of those things that goes around in circles. At one point it seems good to outsource everything, then suddenly they keep it all in-house." Meeting Outlook closes saying, standard professional education to focusing specifically on tech, planners need help and are seeking it. "They need help with technologies and different ways to introduce interactivity to events and maybe with the RFP or proposal systems," Voegeli says. Often, the need goes beyond technology, too. One U.S. planner, who asked to remain anonymous, said, "We see that training is becoming more important. Since individuals are being tasked to do more, we see…that individuals need training in all areas: meetings/events, exhibitions, global protocol." However, some are having trouble finding suitable educational options. Fortunately for others in the meeting industry, providing that training could turn out to be an attractive opportunity for growth in the future. Download full report here!  ...
22 Feb 2017 Happier people, happier meetings #EMEC17
What does neuroscience teach us that can help us slow meetings down? We posed this question to Janet Sperstad, CMP (MPI Wisconsin Chapter), program director for meeting and event management at Madison College. Sperstad will offer more insights on understanding the concept of slow meetings and how they can change the way meetings are currently structured in her session, “Slow Meetings,” at the 2017 MPI European Meetings & Events Conference. Slow meetings is about mindfulness and intentionality. It’s about leveraging the brain’s capacity for insights and creating moments of meaning and less about the activity of learning and consumption of education. Slowing down a meeting creates more time for driving meaning and thinking. As we all know, one of the top reasons why people attend meetings is to learn something new. In our industry it’s common thought that if we have a meeting packed with presentations, discussions and technology to engage the audience it’s a good meeting.  Your brain processes information in one of two ways: automatically or controlled. Social cognition refers to it as the X (Reflexive) and C (Reflective) systems. The X system (automatic) is fast and spontaneous, such as when the doctor hits your knee with a rubber hammer and your foot jerks up or a routine task that doesn’t require thought like tying your shoe. The C system (controlled) is more intentional, requires thinking in a deeper way and is much slower. So what does this mean for our world of meetings and events? It’s about creating white space and light space for thinking. We must have moments that pique our interest and excitement, engaging the senses and physical self, the sweet spot of the X system. We also must use elements that engage our reflective processing system like art, poetry, language, abstract thinking and patterns in nature.  Food for thought: The part of the brain called the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex that is responsible for your brain’s executive functions and memory resides in the C system. Guess where happiness is found in the brain? That’s right, the C system. So creating breathing space for reflective thinking and moments of meaning makes happier people, and happier people make a more successful meeting.” Curation from MPI Blog written by Blair Potter, Managing Editor Meeting Professionals International  ...
14 Feb 2017 Claus Raasted will be co-presenting #EMEC17 closing general session
Claus Raasted, closing general session speaker at MPI’s European Meetings & Events Conference (EMEC)—March 5-7 in Granada, Spain—is an author, producer and community builder who has been organizing live action role-playing (larps) for more than 20 years. He recently wrote a blog post titled “If you went to my larp and didn’t like it, here’s what I’d like you to do.” Noting that some of his larps have been smash hits while some have been a bit disastrous, he goes on to offer some tips about feedback that could be helpful for any meeting planner. Let’s take a look at some of the highlights:   • Don't universalize your own taste. Just because you didn't like something doesn't mean others had the same experience, and just because your tradition/preference/style/norm says something is wrong doesn't mean it necessarily is. You may have disliked the weird dream scene in the middle of the larp, but that doesn't make it objectively bad.         • Don’t assume that nothing can be changed. Telling your friends that, “The characters suck. Don’t play this” is different from saying, “There were problems with the characters, and I wouldn’t recommend going unless they fix them.” In the first case, there’s no room for improvement. In the second, there’s plenty. This is true for all larps, and especially for larps that are run more than once.         • Don’t ignore opportunities to make things better and then complain later. If I tell you, “Come talk to me if you’re bored; I’ll try to help” and you don’t, it’s annoying to hear complaints about it afterwards. I can’t even try to fix problems I’m unaware of. I’m not omniscient. Not even close.         • Don’t think your words don’t matter. This is perhaps the most important. Your praise matters to me. So do your critical words. You are the one who chooses if you want to help and motivate me, or if you want me to think, “Never again. I’m done with larp organizing.”       Raasted says he usually divides his comments into three categories—things he liked; things he thinks were objectively problematic; and things he personally didn’t like, but which were choices—when writing to larp organizers. Visit Raasted’s blog at medium.com/@clausraasted (the one excerpt here is No. 33). He will be co-presenting at the EMEC closing general session with fellow College of Extraordinary Experiences co-founder Paul Bulencea, author of Gamification in Tourism. Curation from MPI Blog - Written by Blair Potter Managing Editor at Meeting Professionals International Register now as rates increase Friday 17 February!  ...
7 Feb 2017 Cities, experiences and social innovation #EMEC17
#EMEC17 break out session Elena Rodríguez Blanco gives you a challenge and asks you to go out and solve it. That process, she says, is the best way to develop a critical mindset, which is an important skill for the 21st century. Visit www.mpiweb.org/emec to learn more about and register for the 2017 European Meetings & Events Conference, March 5-7 in Granada, Spain. “We’re not setting people up to ask the right questions,” Rodríguez Blanco says. “It’s because the traditional format of learning is, for example, me telling you something. That’s why I think travel is very interesting, because it gets you out of your comfort zone and gives you the possibility of exploring unexpected things.”Travel, Rodríguez Blanco feels, is a great teacher through experiences. “The experiential part of learning has made some strides in the last year, but it can go further and eliminate the professor,” she says. “People tend to get a question and go straight to an answer because we’re taught that being efficient is solving something as quickly as possible even if it doesn’t answer the right question. Many times, it’s about asking more questions to find out what it is you need answered. I think travel and experiences make you generate those questions.”The same holds true for the meeting and event industry. “You have a group of people together for a certain amount of time,” she says. “Instead of me spending time—one person sharing the knowledge—we use the collective intelligence of all the knowledge in the room.”And that’s what Rodríguez Blanco plans to do during her session at MPI’s 2017 European Meetings & Events Conference (EMEC) in Granada, Spain, March 5-7. Her session, “Cities, Experiences and Social Innovation,” will offer personal accounts of people making a difference for citizens and tourists alike.“It’s going to be a lot about what we’re doing, but then opening the space for people to ask questions,” Rodríguez Blanco says. “I want to give people the space to think about how they can do things differently.” Relationships Matter Rodríguez Blanco is the co-founder of Authenticitys, a company that connects travelers with local experiences and businesses. It promotes responsible tourism and offers ways people can take in a city’s culture while also adding social value. It is a “B Corporation,” a for-profit designation for companies that promote positive impacts on communities and the environment. Its roots are in education, and one example of the type of experience Authenticitys provides is alternative tours in European cities given by formerly homeless or migrant citizens.“This is not about exoticizing hardship or ‘poverty tourism.’ Rather, it’s about offering tourists and curious visitors a rare opportunity to hear the stories and real-life experiences of people who know a side of the urban landscape that doesn’t often get seen,” Rodríguez Blanco writes on the organization’s blog. “We believe storytelling is one of the most powerful change agents there is, and these kinds of tours not only spark a change in the visitors who go on them, but also in the tour guides who serve them.”And for Rodríguez Blanco, the changes she sees in tourists and guides—and the connections made—drives her to keep working every day. “Three things have changed me,” she says. “One of them is to not feel like the company is yours, but an idea that has come through you, and there’s a whole world there to help you and work with it. Another one is not to attach to the concept of it. It’s not like a child, but instead a partnership in terms of how I view it. In a partnership, you try to build each other up. The third one is the importance of building relationships. We do not view people as providers. It’s a community where we see each other as partners.”The biggest challenge, though, is education. “We’re not only selling a new product but we’re educating our customers on the new product,” she says. “As a small company, that can be very resource intensive. Basically, every time I go sell to a hotel or the event industry, I will have to define what social entrepreneurship is and how sustainability can happen in a fun experience. It’s a bit of a challenge because you’re not selling something people know. You have to spend time teaching and sharing and inviting people to be part of it.”Sometimes, Rodríguez Blanco says, it takes a long time, because people don’t relate to it.“When you say ‘responsible travel’ or ‘sustainable experiences,’ it sounds boring,” she says. “It sounds like something you don’t want to do on a holiday. I spend a lot of time doing PR and talks. It’s exciting, though, because you see people’s eyes shine whenever they see the possibilities.” Rodríguez Blanco hopes EMEC delegates leave with new ideas they can offer their own meeting and event attendees on how to leave locations better than when they arrived and more educated. And there is only one good way to do that, which inspires her daily: “My main drive is relationships with people.”Seems like that should be a good goal for everyone, meeting planner or not. Curation from MPI blog by Jason Hensel, Contributing Writer ...
30 Jan 2017 #EMEC17 Keynote Speakers!
#EMEC17 has a fantastic lineup of speakers and subject matter experts to give you fresh ideas, keep you current on trends and create exciting new pathways for your events —and your career. Opening General session - Surfing the Maverick Economy with Monica Deza Throughout the history of Humanity the innovation of each era has marked the growth and transformation of societies, cultures and businesses. We are at a key moment in which we are already witnessing the creation of a new wave of innovation that will have a Tsunami category and will revolutionize the world economy, which will no longer be based on the simple transformation of inputs into outputs, and technology will not see as a functional optimizer of processes and costs. We are at the dawn of redefining the relationship between machines and people and a new dimension of understanding the world through Artificial Intelligence and cognitive computing. Discover the five keys that will allow surfing in the Mavericks economy, the era whose epicenter will be PEOPLE. We are rationally overloaded but emotionally unattended: Simplification and inspiration. Human creativity is the ultimate economic resource”. Monday General session - How to Remember Anyone and Anything with Boris Nikolai Konrad   In his 15 minute TED type talk, Boris will kick of with a fascinating demonstration of his own memory. Preferably he will meet about 25 people earlier during the conference and will ask these to stand up. He will then name everyone of these names from memory. Going on by explaining why he can do it - which is techniques and training - he leads over to the main part. In this using highly interactive examples the whole audience will join in, He explains the memory techniques enabling his performance and which anyone can use to improve her or his memory remarkably. The first main method to focus on will be for memorizing names and faces. As the current Guinness World Record holder for memory and connecting to his initial performance, he brings unrivaled experience on this topic and will show everyone how to remember any name they want. All this will be done using lots of story telling, humor and interactive exercises. Monday General session - Pitch Perfect with David Beckett Great ideas need a great pitch. Making a great pitch is not about being born with a certain skill: it’s about following a process. In this inspirational talk by Startup Pitch coach David Beckett, you’ll get an introduction to what that process is and how you can get your message shortened and sharpened to great effect. Closing General session - Extraordinary Experience Design with Claus Raasted & Paul Bulencea The economy has changed. Products, services and even experiences are becoming commoditized, and only the truly remarkable stand out from the crowd. Crawl inside the mind of Larp Guru Claus Raasted and the memorable experience designer Paul Bulencea as they share their secrets of how to thrive in the Experience Economy. This keynote is an immersive experience in itself, where you get challenged and get yanked out of your comfort zone and where focus isn’t only on learning-by-listening, but also on learning-by-doing. Looking forward to see you in Granada! MPI team  ...
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