6 Jul 2015 Predictions about Future Conferences and Attendance
It's all about the people Let's face it, face-to-face meetings are here to stay. Technology will contribute and change how we learn, contribute and engage, but it will never take away the effectiveness of face-to-face meetings. In his article, Jeff Hurt from Velvet Chainsaw Consulting, brings attention to this point on several occasions. That is not to say that the concept of conferences wouldn't change drastically. Online will definitely be there to compliment the face-to-face meetings. To make a difference in the future, or even now, you need to be able to adapt. Keeping your mission in focus is more important than ever, but so is choosing the model that you do it with. As the article notes, the way we consume media, just as an example, has changed a lot, so why wouldn't the way we engage in conferences. The opportunity to gain from those events and experiences is a lot greater than the chance to lose. Context, peer-to-peer learning and real engagement are the elements that will provide results. Engagement is not a given fact though. We've always expected that attendance will drive engagement, but according to Jeff Hurt, that model is flipping upside down. It will be engagement that will drive the attendance. Attendees need to be engaged physically and mentally. Make them part of the program rather than making a program for them to just join. The article also refers to Dr. Josh Packard, who states that "attendees prefer active participation to passive consumption". Create the right atmosphere for people to connect Meeting design does also make its appearance on the list in the form of creating those comfortable places within the conference area where the human connection can be naturally created. Building a coffee shop in your venue to foster those connections might very well pay off. Creating those connections does require a bit more thought from the organizers than just scheduling time for networking. Building befriending opportunities into the program will create actual friendships which are much stronger. As the article so eloquently puts it, "meeting in the same location doesn't mean relationships are developing". One important thing is not to over complicate and over-schedule your conference. It may seem like a good thing to have something for everyone, but in the end conference guests will leave the event overwhelmed and needing a vacation to process everything. Keeping the program simple and efficient will work better in your favor. That does not, however, mean that large scale conferences would disappear. When the program is built so that it's easy for the attendee to customize their own journey, the size of the conference doesn't matter. There's anyway room for larger conferences and for the more intimate ones. Read the full article and all the predictions at Velvet Chainsaw Consulting. MPI member's can also access the Future of Meetings Research for free. Download it here. To access all the MPI research and studies for free, join now as a member.  MPI in Europe team...
29 Jun 2015 The Power of (Good) Data !
I love how good business intelligence, fed by strong data, allows me to present meaningful information that can help an organization move in the right direction. I learned the discipline working for a Starwood property, then applied it at Maritz Travel in the meeting environment. At one point, I was leading a team of about 10 business analysts, and, as data nerds, we decided to create a Top 10 List of Data Management Tips. (I doubt very much David Letterman has covered this one.) We created this list in the context of strategic meetings management programs, but these rules can be applied to other environments. Top 10 Data Management Tips Meeting-level details should be accurate in order to report on trends at the portfolio level. Build a thorough quality control process and know the pedigree of your data. Correct data at its source, not manually in data extracts. Technology is an enabler not a solution to your business intelligence effort; assume ownership of your technology landscape (structure, training, reporting tools). Reporting is not business intelligence; data turns into business intelligence through analysis.   Never send a report or analysis to stakeholders without proper guidance and interpretation. Use correct visual displays (charts) and avoid pie charts; it is easy to distort a story with the wrong chart choice. The content of your report is more important than the format. Get excited about the value of your data, not by the elegance of your solution to obtain it. Look for benchmarking information to validate your findings. Track metrics that can be aligned with benchmarking data. Align your metrics with your goals and objectives so analysis can lead to behavior changes, if so desired. Start an analysis with a clear idea of what the final result should look like, but be willing to explore as the data appear. Do not overcomplicate your meeting metrics environment, and be aware of the complexity of some deceptively simple metrics such as CPPD (cost per attendee per day). Whatever your current operating environment is, use these rules to tell more meaningful and impactful stories using good data. And most importantly, when you have data, don't keep it under wraps. But how can we use them in our day to day activity of event planners? What is Data Responsiveness? Capturing and using data to inform future actions will help you respond to future trends quickly and with more impact.  Andrew McAfee and Erik Brynjolfsson of the Harvard Business Review simply express it “you can’t manage what you don’t measure.” This is supported by Rob Allen who, in MPI's Future of Meetings research, believes that good decisions and responses are informed from data that is collected, interpreted and applied to the business. A critical step in future-readiness: “The way in which you respond to the information you possess.” Allen also believes that integration of technological platforms, in particular improving synchronization between suppliers, systems and procedures which in turn improves confidence levels of your clients. What type of data is relevant to your business or your clients? It is about tracking activity, measuring sales, ROI, ROO, conversion rates and algorithms. How could this apply to meetings? Many tools help with this such as delegate identification, attendee behavior, and registration hot points but these are not widely adopted nor communicated. The focus of competitiveness in the meetings industry could well be centered on demonstrating with data the value of your events. Because of what you measure you will know more about your business and your clients and direct this to every decision you and they make. For Rob Allen the ability to use the information you get from clients and how you use this in your business and delivery of your event is essential just to maintain competitive advantage. For example, Certain Inc. offers a results measurement service that can demonstrate specific value indicators for your event. And Dataflow Events can manage your delegate database extrapolating key marketing information in order for you to attract additional clients. In the age of Information and technology, businesses need to enable employees to exploit their skills and competencies so that they can review and act upon consumer trends, evaluate and build relationships and rapidly respond to changing market conditions. Christian Savelli and Jessie States, Meeting Professionals International...
22 Jun 2015 MPI The Netherlands Chapter presents: Tour de France 2015!
On July 2nd, MPI The Netherlands Chapter organises a great event at the Leeuwenbergh about the Grand Départ of the most famous European cycling race, the ‘Tour de France’. The Leeuwenbergh is an beautifull ancient building in the center of Utrecht. The Tour de France is Europes biggest sporting event that takes place each year. During this MPI event that will take up the entire afternoon and evenening, the members of MPI will get a unique peak in how the city of Utrecht has managed to get this ‘départ’ into their city and how it will be presented to the audience. Several well know Dutch speakers such as Henk de Breij, Hermannus Stegeman, Erik van Dijk,  Ronald Besemer and Paul van Vlijmen will tell their personal story and their involment in a yearlong effort to get this event. The cooperation between the private sector, local government. The opportunities the Grand depart offers to the city of Utrecht and it’s region. Of course at the MPI event we will address the challenges that come with the organisation of such a big event in such a small country. This year will be the 6th time the Tour de France starts in The Netherlands. Several key members of the organisation will inform the participants of the MPI event about the added value of the Grand depart to the city of Utrecht. And there will be room to ask questions in how certain challenges and uncertainties were solved. At the end of the afternoon we will move the event to Utrechts famous ‘Lepelenbrug’ for the presentation of the 17 participating teams of the Tour de France. The tour will start on July 4th and end at July 26 in, of course Paris. It will be another great MPI event, organised by the Events department of MPI The Netherlands Chapter. We think that providing such ‘insights’ to these kind of events is very important to our members. Bringing people together, learning and sharing experience and expertise is all MPI The Netherlands Chapter is all about says Marielle den Hertog, President of MPI The Netherlands Chapter. MPI The Netherlands Chapter...
22 Jun 2015 Women & Leadership: The Voice as the Instrument of Emotion and Authority
Invisible, elusive yet fundamental, the voice is an impactful tool of communication. Recently, in a discussion with American opera singer and performance coach Laura Baxter, we talked about the impact of the voice on women in leadership positions. “The voice is everything.”She said. “It is the voice —not the body language —that creates emotion. A full, rich voice conveys confidence and competence. It says, ‘Here I am. I own this space.’ Imagine this: a woman walks into the room dressed to the nines. She looks gorgeous in every sense of the word and all eyes are on her. Then she opens her mouth to speak and a high, peepsy, Minnie Mouse voice comes out. Everyone in the room has to stop and readjust their image of this woman. The voice matters, and it matters big.” For Guida Bulha, Principal of Safari Vocal and certified trainer in vocal expression, the voice translates one’s « état d’être » : Joy, fear, anger, sadness…the voice is one’s identity, it conveys one’s history. « From its very early days, a fœtus is already able to connect with his mother ‘s voice »says Guida. She reminds us how a calm deep voice is reassuring and credible. As an example, she recalls the French presidential debate between Ségolène Royal and Nicolas Sarkozy in 2007: On that day, Royal not only lost her temper but she completely lost a chance to become the first French President at the same time. Another example Guida gives is the following: Every year, Forbes publishes the list the World's 100 Most Powerful Women. Out of the 10 first women in 2013 and 2014 only one has a fuller voice: Mary Barra. Still, she is the first female head of a Big 3 automaker! And while her voice is a little fuller, she inspires self-confidence and authority. According to Laura, society has certain subconscious expectations of how the voice of someone in a leadership position should sound. We believe that a person with a deep voice is more intelligent, competent and pleasant. We want to be around this person, and we want to follow this person. We consider this person to have leadership qualities. On the other hand, if someone has a high, thin, peepsy voice, we tend to think that this person is unintelligent, naive, and insecure. We would far rather make fun of this person than follow him or her « Because of these societal expectations, women in leadership positions try to copy their male colleagues »says Laura. « This leads to them seeming unauthentic, ineffective and often insecure ».  In our conversation, Laura said that there are three most common mistakes that women in leadership positions make with their voices: 1) They try to speak unnaturally low to appear more authoritative 2) More often than men, women business leaders end their sentences in an open cadence and, 3) They tend to speak more softly instead of filling the room with their voice and owning it. Mistake #1: Pressing the voice in order to speak lower Society expects leaders to have clear, deep, full voices. What constitutes a deep, full voice, however, is often different than what we think. We believe that men speak lower in pitch than women, they automatically have an advantage in this area. This is, however, a myth. What gives your voice depth and authority —male or female —is the over- and undertones that you generate. These are what make your voice round and full, and these are what make the voice seem deeper and richer. The way that we activate the over- and undertones is through vocal training and a basic understanding of how the voice works. It is possible for each of us to have a full, rich voice, and it worth working on it to achieve this! Mistake #2: Open Cadence at the end of the sentence An open cadence is when the voice goes up or lifts at the end of a sentence. We do this for one of several reasons. One reason that this may happen is that the speaker wants to appear sympathetic or understanding. Another reason is that the speaker feels insecure, or yet another reason could be that the speaker simply is using the wrong posture. Unfortunately, however, when this happens, the result is that we appear to be asking a question instead of making a statement. This confuses your listener and leaves them not knowing how to respond to you. Mistake #3: They don’t own the room and fill the room with their voice Women are more likely to try to find compromises than their male counterparts. They are also more likely to take a back seat to their counterparts. This often means that they don’t stand up and own the room. They tend to speak softly in order to be polite (or because they don’t believe that they should take the stage!), and as a result, their voices —both in the sense of their actual voices and in the sense of their opinions —are not heard. Article brought to you by Maguy Sicuro, Managing Director of SICURO EVENTS and VP Membership for MPI French Switzerland Chapter. For more information on the voice as a tool for leadership, please visit :  http://www.voice4leadership.de/us/ http://www.safari-vocal.com/...
15 Jun 2015 Finding your professional edge at WEC in San Francisco !
Education for everyone The WEC 2015 educational slate features the topics that, and people who, will help you think and grow in new ways. WEC educational sessions give attendees best practice tools and research, exposure to sound business practices and the latest business trends. Speakers will include James Curleigh, executive vice president of Levi Strauss & Co. and president of the Levi’s brand; Evelyne White, co-founder and CEO of social dining community BookaLokal (a video interview from EMEC 2015 below); Pamela Meyer, author of the national best-seller Liespotting; Liz Murray, international bestselling author who went from being homeless to a Harvard graduate; and Yigit Pura, Season 1 winner of television show “Top Chef Just Desserts.” But the world of conference education is changing. And while many learners enjoy the classroom, many others crave individualized and customized education, one-on-one and one-on-few conversations and interactive learning solutions. The mass availability of online education is driving learners to seek context from their peers and from subject matter experts in conversations and discussions, as opposed to lectures and panels. MPI has created a solution to address this. Career and Learning Central acts as MPI’s learning laboratory, offering a variety of unique learning opportunities—for the individual, the small group and the masses— presenting the resources learners need to expand their knowledge, strengthen their careers and transform their events outside the confines of the concurrent session space. In each of its core areas, MPI not only shakes up the education headspace, but showcases innovation and experimentation as a means to knowledge and advancement. Make an appointment with career and résumé professionals, hold pop-up meetings with your peers, brainstorm solutions, attend educational campfire discussions—even ask an industry resource expert for answers to your event challenges. Meanwhile, big ideas can also come in small doses during MPI’s Flash Point sessions. Flash Points provide you with a unique 15-minute burst format to gain valuable education that is different from anything else at the WEC. Speakers from outside the industry will share their big ideas, providing you with a unique lens from outside. Come early and take a certificate preconference course in healthcare compliance, sustainable meetings, event design or mobile apps. Each course comes with CMP clock hours, and you can leave WEC with a new certificate for your résumé and new knowledge to advance your events. Attendees at MPI’s annual global conference include meeting and business event industry professionals; suppliers from the tourism, technology and hospitality sectors; students; and hospitality faculty, all of whom are ready to find their professional edge. For more information or to register for the event, visit www.mpiweb.org/wec. Below is Evelyne White's interview at EMEC 2015 conference where she was also a speaker. Writen by Jessie States, Manager of Professional Development...
9 Jun 2015 JMIC Conference Advances a Broader Industry Value Proposition
Over fifty Meetings Industry leaders, academics, research organizations and related resources met on May 14 and 15 in Paris under the auspices of the Joint Meetings Industry Council (JMIC) to review the current status of progress on documenting and communicating the value of meetings as drivers of economic, academic and professional development and to and make strategic recommendations for advancing this in the future. At stake was the ability of the industry to more effectively demonstrate the kinds of values that are now considered to be amongst the top reasons governments and businesses invest in the infrastructure required to support industry growth and development.  “We know from experience that governments are highly interested in the ways our industry can be used to advance their economic and community development agendas, but we have been slow to come up with the kinds of defensible measures for these benefits that can be used to support the required investment” said JMIC President and  IAPCO Past-President Philippe Fournier. “The purpose of this conference was to assess our progress toward such measures and to encourage better communications and alignment of the various industry organizations working toward that objective by bringing together a broad and representative group of industry interests along with their advisors and researchers. I believe we achieved that objective and now have a serious of industry- developed recommendations that we will be able to work with in aligning future work in this area.” The two day conference took place at the Palais des Congrès de Paris and included sessions that spoke to defining the need for better value measures, supplied case studies of work done to date and reviewed the kinds of data currently generated by both Meetings Industry and global tourism and travel organizations. These were followed by a series of workshops that considered alternate strategies and made recommendations for moving forward. Amongst the conclusions and recommendations were: The measures that best reflect the benefits associated with meetings conventions and exhibitions are those that capture their business, academic, professional and economic development benefits in addition to just their economic impacts; Such benefits are more challenging to quantify as they don’t always lend themselves to direct measurement and may involve long term, often complex outcomes; However, well documented case studies or “compelling stories” that illustrate the key values are an equally or even more effective way to illustrate and communicate overall value principles; Much related data is already available from various professional, corporate and academic sources would have to be re-interpreted to support value measurement as it has generally been gathered for other purposes; Gathering additional specialized data would require a collaborative approach based on a shared sense of purpose amongst both industry suppliers and those organizing events To be effective, value messages must be interpreted / adapted to address the needs and interests of a variety of different audiences and there is therefore no single value measure that can be used for all applications; In particular, messages and case studies should align with societal priorities, local aspirations and governmental policies in order to demonstrate the greatest relevance; This approach would best be supported by creating a repository of relevant and well-documented case studies consisting of submissions that; Utilize a standard template to ensure consistency Have been curated by an academic / industry body to ensure relevance and adherence to appropriate standards Represent as wide a range of sectors and geographic regions as possible to broaden their applicability to various needs and audiences, and Are developed and maintained in collaboration with event organizers. An effort should also be made to further align industry nomenclature to make it easier for key audiences to identify who and what is included in the industry definition.  “This conference was an important consensus-building exercise that now enables us to move forward with a shared sense of purpose”, said Fournier. “The challenge now will be to decide how best to act on these excellent recommendations, which is a task that must be undertaken by a number of industry associations acting both individually and collectively. It will be a challenging undertaking, but one that will have a huge impact on the future of our industry as we simply cannot fail if we want to be taken seriously by our respective communities and governments”. The active member associations who comprise JMIC today are: AACVB, the Asian Association of Convention and Visitor Bureaus AIPC, the International Association of Convention Centres ASAE, the American Society of Association Executives Cocal, the Latin American Confederation of PCO and Related Companies DMAI, Destination Marketing Association International ECM, European Cities Marketing EFAPCO, the European Federation of Associations of Professional Congress Organisers EVVC, European Association of Event Centres IAPCO, the International Association of Professional Congress Organizers ICCA, the International Congress and Convention Association IFES, the International Federation of Exhibition and Event Services MPI, Meeting Professionals International PCMA, the Professional Convention Management Association Site, the Society of Incentive & Travel Executives UFI, the Global Association of the Exhibition Industry UIA, The International Union of Associations JMIC is supported by IMEX and ibtm world  ...
1 Jun 2015 MPI SPAIN CELEBRATES "DIA DEL ORGULLO MICE"!
On May 11th, 12 Spanish cities joined the celebration with the support of seven major industry associations: OPC Spain, ICCA Spanish Chapter, AFE (Spanish Fair Association), Spain DMC, SITE Spain, GMIC, AEVEA and EMA (Event Mangar Association). The event brought together meetings and events professionals in 12 major Spanish cities simultaneosly: Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia, Sevilla, Bilbao, Málaga, Córdoba, Granada, Valladolid, Burgos, Santander and Gijón. Local industry representatives gathered at 7 pm in all cities to reiterate the importance of the Meetings and Events sector in the Spanish economy . Dia del Orgullo MICE was sponsored by NH Hotel Group who hosted the event in each city. During the event all cities showed a video interview of Mr Antonio López de Ávila and Mr Enrique Lancis, main representatives of SEGITTUR ( Spanish entity for  innovation and technology in tourism). They shared their views on two current major topics: the relevance of this sector in Spain and the importance of Big Data within the industry. If you want to watch the interview (in spanish) of Mr Antonio López de Ávila, President at SEGITTUR, click below: The MICE Price Day had a country-wide scope thanks to the support of the main associations and convention bureaus which assisted with the organization and shared the news with the press at a local and national level.  "MPI Spain intends for this event to serve as recognition for all the work carried out at each location on behalf of the MICE community" said Raul Fernandez Sobrino MPI Spain VP of Communication. MPI Spain Chapter is the first MPI Chapter in Europe to celebrate a National Day of the Meetings & Events Industry and we foresee more Chapter to join them in the years to come. Here are some pictures of this event. It should also be noted that for the first time on April 16th this year, the North American Meeting Industry Day was jointly celebrated across Canada, the U.S.A. and Mexico. But we must remember that the very first Meeting Industry Day started in Canada from an MPI initiative several years ago and is now a success and best practices for most of the MPI Chapters. The MPI in Europe Team    ...
25 May 2015 Can we count what counts at meetings and events? by Jackie Mulligan
At the JMIC May conference, industry leaders agreed we should better measure the value of meetings. But how and what we measure divided opinions and highlighted inconsistencies in how and what we count as value in and outside our sector. The good news was that in the many debates about how to define our industry, how to establish consistency in the measures we use to show value, whether it was even possible to measure outcomes like knowledge, innovation, learning … Some excellent examples, perspectives and clear new directions emerged.  “We don’t care about the cups of coffee!” was the defining statement from outside our industry when Isabel Bardinet CEO European Society of Cardiology described her work on the ESC congress. Her frustration with the focus on the halo effect of meetings rather than business within the event was clear. The congress she manages as part of the Association activities attracts over 30,000 participants and one outcome “changing practice on heart failure globally”. A pretty impressive outcome when you consider that cardiovascular disease kills 4 million people in Europe a year.  In fact she went further… Thanks to the congress that has measurably changed practice and knowledge we have all gained 7 years extra life! When put like that, the meetings industry focus on room nights, food and beverage, transport seemed indeed to be the tip of the ‘value’ iceberg, with the really interesting stuff far beneath the water.   The visibility of those ‘underwater’ outcomes was the big challenge. Professor Leo Jago claimed that ‘not everything that counts can be counted’. Speakers from ICCA, UIA, DMAI showed the varied measures being used, with different metrics, sample types and outcomes classed as important. So the discussions fluctuated between numbers to stories. The stories of events that change lives or city spaces notably from London & Partners strategic successes like TechWeek a week of thousands of tech centred events. The stories of mapping events to match governmental policies and strategies highlighted by Business Events Australia - all seemed more compelling ways of demonstrating outcomes, more valuable than coffee cups. Compelling messages was a strong aspect for Karen Kotowski from CIC who shared the council’s research that highlighted how what we have used as the compelling parts of our business namely the money generated by hosting a meeting, are not the compelling reasons for why government officials choose to book meetings. No wonder then, that as leaders in small groups discussed if and how broader outcomes from meetings could be measured and how to communicate those, the focus remained on the messages, the audiences, the stories. More stories. The stories highlight the varied values and also in several cases are being measured by associations, by CVBs and by researchers. All good stories need a strong narrative, a convincing storyline and the right people to tell it. At this point the importance of advocates outside the industry was clear. Not meeting associations shouting about those outcomes but client groups, medical associations and more. So from the fragmented picture, some unifying actions and broad consensus emerged which will be followed up in the coming weeks and months. Rod Cameron summarised these as establishing a shared sense of mission, developing more case studies so that the full economic, societal and business impacts could emerge and understanding that whilst consistency and global messages would be important ‘local application’ would be key because ‘no single message works for everyone’. So JMIC in Paris – the outcome? A powerful final part to developing a value-centred agenda that the meetings industry could well need to count on in the short and longer term. Written by Jackie Mulligan, Principal Lecturer & Director of Enterprise at Leeds Beckett University and MPI UK & Ireland Board Member. ...
18 May 2015 MPI Italia Chapter XXIV Annual Convention
The culture of integrated thinking to evolve and innovate Culture is a fundamental component of every community, age, species with a critical impact on the evolution of people, countries, organisational systems. Culture is a particular organization’s collection of practices, the way we do things around here.  When cultural practices are aligned with the processes in an organization, performance improves. We will explain it through the link between biodiversity, ecosystems, change management in the wonderful framework of the most ancient Botanical Garden in the world and the most modern Biodiversity Garden of Padua. MPI Italia Annual Convention key aspects  Culture gives us the opportunity to understand the past, lead the present, imagine the future. For this reason, the sustainable XXIV edition of MPI Italia Convention 2015 will take place in the Botanical Garden of Padua, the oldest university garden in the world to have retained its original location and layout over the centuries since 1545 to combat the continual theft of plants, targeted for the rarity of their vegetal properties and the value of the medicines. Since 1997 the Botanical Garden of Padua has been part of the Unesco World Heritage List as a cultural landmark representing the birth of scientific exchanges and the understanding of the relationship between nature and culture. In September 2014 the Biodiversity Garden of Padua - Solar Active Building - open to the public new areas, representing the different climates across the Planet with about 1,300 species in environments sharing the same humidity and temperature characteristics, simulating the climatic conditions of the planet's biomes, from tropical to sub-humid, temperate and arid zones. Following a perfect balance of form and content in a meeting design perspective, the multi-sensorial bio experiential lab and the interactive sessions with the expert speakers will offer the opportunity to raise awareness on the issue of biodiversity conservation and evolution applied to people and processes, to learn from the past, explore and analyse the present, transform and evolve to the future through diversity and inclusion in order to create a vibrant network of opportunities and group connections and unity in respect of the individual nature.  Change is a key component in our personal and professional life. Developing a biodiversity-based approach to people, products, services, we minimize negative impacts on the natural and cultural resources while bringing equal benefit to our life, the local communities, companies. The international cut of the Convention is aimed to engage all the Chapters across EMEA Region and possible the ones overseas as well. MPI Italia to stage in July the XXIV Sustainable Annual Convention in Padua dedicated to the culture of Biodiversity, Integrated Thinking and Change Management, click the image to download the program and submission form to attend. Stay Tuned Follow us on Twitter at the hashtag: #MPITAcon15 and on Facebook page.   See you there! Olimpia Ponno, President and Maria Rosaria Broggi, VP Communication of MPI Italia...
11 May 2015 Meetings Outlook 2015 Spring Edition
Thanks to continuing periods of stability and moderate economic improvement, meeting professionals finally have a chance to take a breath and do some big-picture thinking. Increasingly stable business conditions are enabling meeting professionals to perform more strategically against a reliable backdrop. However, business conditions are increasing at a faster pace in the USA than in Europe and Canada. Long periods of stable, moderate growth allow organizations the opportunity to become more strategic: To evaluate hiring practices To learn details of new technology To research and evaluate best practices To focus on training To take a little risk, and experiment with new ideas To prepare (and repair) long term goals To look forward with less fear of failure To become smarter about their business and opportunities. Though budgets are a concern for many respondents, growth IS PROJECTED FOR all regions. When live attendance growth is stronger than budget growth, however, it can feel as if the budget is shrinking, as a result, meeting planners are confronted with the on-going challenge of doing more with less. Meeting Professionals in Europe seem to rely a bit more on Meeting Design and innovation than Meeting Professionals in North America who tend to rely more on compressing meeting time and leveraging technology Technology is still top of mind for Meeting Professional. However, Social Media is becoming more and more mainstream. Meeting and event professionals do not reference Social Media with as much trepidation as a year ago, and the idea of adapting to new options and techniques is not as defensive as it once was; it is simply easier. Mobile Apps are also an area supporting Intelligent Growth. The use of apps is also moving beyond the tactical (e.g.,replacing printed materials) and into attendee behavior. Meeting professionals are starting to look at leveraging this technology more and more to support strategic objectives. “All of this is opening a new era for meetings, as attendee behavior data is going to explode—and it will help in shaping meeting design in multiple areas,” says MPI’s Christian Savelli. MPI members can download the full research here.  If you are not a member yet, see Membership advantages here! You are the most welcome to join the panel of experts for the next Meetings Outlook survey by sending an email to: research@mpiweb.org The MPI in Europe Team...
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