14 Nov 2016 Data data everywhere, but not a strategy in sight
Event planners must further develop comprehensive data usage strategies if they are to succeed in a world of big data, according to speakers at the latest MPI Insights event from the UK & Ireland Chapter. Led by CWT’s Vice President EMEA, Ian Cummings and Cvent’s Regional Sales Manager, Kevin Christensen, the two speakers agreed that while data is becoming more readily available, it isn’t always being properly utilised. ‘There is a massive amount of data around. From pre-event information to post-event feedback, plus so much information on individuals. Event apps are being developed all the time, with more than 300 currently available in the events market. What we need to be doing is developing data strategies, to assess what we want to know and how we can find this out with the technology available to us?’ said Ian Cummings. Adding that ‘there’s no point gathering data if you don’t know what to do with it’, he said 'a strategy was integral to improving events year-on-year.’ Kevin Christensen of Cvent pointed out that many companies didn’t fully understand the point of data collecting technologies, saying that the cost is too high. ‘If you want to add a chip in a delegate badge to obtain information, it doesn’t actually cost that much,’ he explained. ‘It can add up for really large-scale events that cover a wide area though and this may be deterring some people.’ However, Cummings said that value of data significantly outweighed the cost. ‘As we progress in the tech industry, the price point of all this technology is coming down anyway- so I don’t think it’s something that should be a primary concern. It’s an investment that pays back.’  Held at the Amba Hotel Marble Arch, which has recently completed a £30 million investment and refurbishment programme, the event attracted thirty event industry professionals from organisations including BNY Mellon, Edwardian Group London, Hyatt Hotels, the Local Authority Building Control, Oman Visitor & Convention Bureau and PRG XL Video. Written by Deborah Kelly, VP Marketing & Communications, MPI UK&I Chapter    ...
7 Nov 2016 Fall edition of MPI Meetings Outlook is out!
With each passing year, Stephen Catt, EdD (MPI Pittsburgh Chapter), ramps up security at Butler County Community College, where he is director of events and grant management. Visit the MPI website to read the full Meetings Outlook report. The bucolic suburban campus in the Greater Pittsburgh area frequently hosts events ranging from theatrical performances to a regional workshop for librarians. To make sure the school is prepared for potentially violent incidents, campus police were trained to handle active shooter strategies about two years ago and received training in using assault rifles. “If the worst-case scenario did happen on our campus they could respond quickly and in a professional way, just like any well trained police force,” Catt says. The college of about 3,000 students has also changed all of the locks on the doors to its classrooms and meeting rooms so that they can be locked from the inside, and assigned individual employees the role of building monitors so that they can lock the exterior doors to a building so no one can enter. The college also sets aside time twice each year for professional education of the staff and faculty on what to do if there is an active shooter on campus, and has invited an FBI agent to address the group on protecting themselves and others. “We all acknowledged this is the last thing we want to think about or talk about,” Catt says. Nonetheless, he notes, the administration knows it needs to be proactive—and its approach has caught on so much that other community colleges have asked for advice on how to implement similar programs. Concerns such as those at Butler County Community College echoed throughout MPI’s most recent Meetings Outlook survey. At a time when headlines are filled with stories of terrorism, turbulent political rallies, protests turned violent and the threat of the Zika virus, many meeting professionals are giving safety and security top priority in their spending. “The No. 1 thing they are budgeting for in 2017 is safety and security,” says Bill Voegeli (MPI Georgia Chapter), president of Association Insights, the Atlanta-area research firm that conducts the survey. Though safety and security barely made the list of current trends in the survey, meeting professionals’ actions told another story. Among respondents, 15 percent said they had increased threat preparedness and response awareness, 14 percent said security had influenced the selection of a destination or location and 13 percent said they were coming up with more detailed, documented plans. Another 13 percent said they were providing more employee training. The research found that many meeting professionals are taking other steps as well, such as the following: 1) Better communications with attendees regarding security issues and emergency response are being developed 2) More onsite security personnel are being employed 3) More event insurance is being purchased 4) Vendor selection is being influenced by vendor reputation and hiring standards 5) Technology is being vetted for cyber security credentials. For more detailed information please download the full report. Written by Blair Potter, Managing editor for The Meeting Professional ...
1 Nov 2016 Rethinking management in a time of VUCA
In time of increasing turbulence and dynamism that define the VUCA world - the volatile, uncertain, complex, ambiguous nature of today’s global business environment inside and outside the meeting & event industry - many people need to rethink their peronal and professional pathways, to find new keys to success and second chances. In order to face the nature, speed, volume, magnitude, and dynamics of change, the lack of predictability of issues and events, the confounding of issues and the chaos that surrounds any organization, the haziness of reality and the mixed meanings of conditions, we should remove our greatest obstacle, the illusion of knowledge, and start a journey into change and transformation with responsability, awareness, creativity and fun. The rethinking management process is based on cognitive experiences  and performing activities  with a critical impact on people, communities, organisations. The first step is to set the scene and analyse the stage of  lifecycle (personal, professional, inside and outside the company) and go through what we identify as the 16 R-Factors critical to professional recreation, to translate our need of change into action.   Quoting Daniel J. Boorstin “The courage to imagine the otherwise is our greatest resource, adding color and suspense to all our life”. To this purpose, we need to cultivate and stimulate an open and explorative mind-set to be imaginative, curious, perceptive, creative, artistic, thoughtful and intellectual. Researches conducted by Scott Barry Kaufman reveal that the desire to learn and discover seemed to have significantly more bearing on creative accomplishments than cognitive ability did. He found that people with high levels of cognitive engagement with imagination, emotions and beauty were more likely to make significant artistic creative achievements than people who were only high in IQ or divergent thinking ability (the ability to explore many possible solutions to a problem). We are surrounded by daily VUCA context, but we have been entered the era of the curious leaders, where success may be less about having all the answers and more about wondering and questioning. When asked recently to name the one attribute CEOs will need most to succeed in the turbulent times ahead, Michael Dell, the chief executive of Dell, Inc., replied “I would place my best on curiosity.” To raise awareness of the potential new approaches to reality and V.U.C.A context we train people to put the 16 R-Factors into practice through creative labs, developing new skills, abilities, knowledge, to face tangible and intangible aspects of the lifecycle, to change perspectives and write new stories. Written by Olimpia Ponno, Past President MPI Italia Chapter For more information on the topic you are kindly invited to attend the session 'The R-factors (keys to success) of creativity: Rethinking management in a time of VUCA' on 30th November at IBTM  at 11:00 - 11:45 Room 3, or send your point of view to info@olimpiaponno.com and continue the discussion online.    ...
24 Oct 2016 Evolve or Die, a simple choice for professional associations?
Anyone who has worked in, or been an active member of, a professional association over the last decade during the financial crisis, knows that the challenges confronting organizations are many and complex. The solutions to these challenges often appear to be a double edged-sword, bringing risks as well as benefits, and creating friction between members and their own association. As a professional working in an association, on one hand you are battling against the comfort of the status quo, consolidating what you already have, and not risking financial resources on change that will probably be difficult and occasionally painful. After a few turbulent years recently, your membership base may be showing signs of stabilizing, or even growing as retention rates rise and recruitment picks up, even though overall growth rates have not yet surpassed the pre-financial crisis figures. At this point, the appeal of the age-old saying “Don’t fix what ain’t broke” is certainly a strong one; one probably supported by the valued cohort of long-term members who are often content with the way things are done and see change as unnecessary. On the other hand, you are faced with all the challenges that come with the digital-age that we now inhabit. Consider the maturation of ‘Millennials’ and their ideals of social licence and you know change is coming whether you’re ready or not. The unknowns facing you if you lunge into the abyss that comes with any journey of change and transformation are daunting, and the risks associated with the unknowns can make taking the leap difficult.Perhaps the only certainty is that maintaining the status quo is no longer a guarantee that your association will be relevant ten, five or even two years down the line. Associations, particularly ones that are purpose driven as the IWA is, cannot afford to ignore external influences if they hope to fulfill their vision for the future. The internet, digital media and social sharing has eroded our traditional value propositions; access to content and networks that were previously out of reach are now available or have been replaced by other platforms. Increasingly businesses are forced to confront their operating models to become fit for a sustainable future – a future where generational values have shifted enormously. Where organizations fail to meet these new values, their future is no longer certain. Ad hoc networks and online communities with business models designed to support positive social impact are cropping up to fill the void. The intent of these organisations is increasingly overlapping with the raison d’être of associations, “to inform and to share best practice, to build a community of like minded professionals”. As the landscape of associations changes, it’s legitimate to ask whether they can survive the 21st century? Whether, without a radical transformation in the way they go about their activities and the way they engage with their stakeholders, they can fulfill their purpose and mission? The IWA has started a process of change that is designed to answer these questions, and to meet the challenges of the association today and into the future. Despite lengthy consultation, focus groups, questionnaires, and one-on-one interviews with stakeholders to guide us, at times it feels akin to rolling the dice. The journey hasn’t always been easy, or without some institutional pain. At times the transformation has been disruptive, at times we’ve had to rethink our plans and choose a different course. Progress has been too slow for some, too fast for others, but progress has been made. We have moved away from long-standing processes and systems our business model was based on. We have established an online community* for our members to network, connect and collaborate. This moves our thriving offline network into the digital space. We have opened up to be inclusive of those thousands of professionals who engage with the IWA but choose not to become members. Though this journey is far from over, making these fundamental changes has taken the IWA towards meeting its needs in the future. If our association is to have a future it cannot be held back by its history. Rather we want that history to be our inspiration for continued growth and innovation that enables us to continue to be purpose driven and to fulfil our mission. Which way will you roll the dice? Written for UIA newsletter by Chloe Menhinick, Network Engagement Manager, International Water Association MPI is a Member of #UIA for 2016 and will participate to http://www.uia.org/roundtable in Monaco where this topic will be discussed....
18 Oct 2016 Senior meeting pros: Taking it to the next level !
Pull together a group of about 20 passionate senior meeting and event professionals to talk about professional development and there’s no shortage of topics. The problem is there’s a shortage of solutions. While the group acknowledged progress has been made, more is needed. That much was clear following a Senior Meeting Executive Group Therapy education session during Smart Monday, powered by MPI, at IMEX America. Session facilitator Cathy DosSantos (MPI Philadelphia Area Chapter), senior director of operations at Maritz Travel, said Monday’s session was the result of work done by MPI’s Senior Executive Task Force, which has recognized the need to develop and expand education for senior meeting and event professionals.“We knew that this is one of things this group needs—peer to peer,” she said. The attendees’ experience range was between 15 and 35 years in the industry, with corporate planners, supplies and third-party planners at the table. It didn’t take long for the attendees to identify nearly a dozen topics of interest before settling on innovation and creativity, rebranding the event planner, industry consolidation and high-level education for more in-depth conversation. The group was split into two, with each group brainstorming two of the topics.“We talk about taking the individual to the next level,” said Darell Stokes, vice president of strategic sourcing at Prestige Global Meeting Source in San Francisco, who was with the group discussing high-level education. “How can we learn and grow to the next level? Where do we go? How do we get a masters-level degree, not academic, but one where we understand procurement and marketing?”Ariel Crohn (MPI Connecticut River Valley Chapter), corporate meeting and travel manager at Coverys in Boston, followed the senior-level track at the World Education Congress (WEC) and even attended the MPI Thought Leaders Summit.“The track at WEC was good, I did notice the difference,” she said. “The audience is different and the topics are different.” A formal mentoring program, for example, is something else that could be considered, she said. There are challenges all around—lack of understanding of the role of the meeting planner at the corporate office, access to information and diversity of education. Crohn shared how she attended an event and was finally able to join an exclusive list serv. “I was able to get on the secret list serv,” she said. “I can’t share the list, but I now have 39 people that I can learn from.”She said that, in addition to a lack of understanding about job role, there often is no clear trajectory for growth within a company.“Senior executives don’t understand the meetings and events business,” Stokes added. “There’s an opportunity for training senior executives on what we do, too.”DosSantos said this type of communication is needed to get a greater understanding of growth opportunities.“We do want to build a community of senior meeting executives and it starts with sessions like this,” she said. “We need to hear what is needed and then our goal is to come up with solutions.” By Rich Luna, Director of Publishing MPI...
12 Oct 2016 Anticipation is building for EMEC 2017 in Granada, Spain!
Once again, Eva Garde – marketing director at the Granada Convention Bureau, MPI Spain Chapter board member and chair of the EMEC17 Host Committee – was a wonderful host over the 2 ½ days. In addition to AV supplier selection meetings and mapping out the meeting space to design the physical set-up of the learning experience at the Granada Congress Centre, MPI Education and Event team members Andrew Walker, Miranda van Brück, Virginia Hall and Mara Jackson, along with VP Education and Events Matt Marcial, sampled the delicious cuisine of in-house caterer Abades, who presented a wonderful selection of local, seasonal and healthy brain food options to consider. After lunch the team divided, with Miranda and Virginia meeting with several local DMCs to discuss an exciting new element of EMEC – immersive experiences that will bring the participants out of the congress centre and into the city, reinforcing the Local Inspiration element of Meetovation that has always been a part of this conference but was given special attention this past year at EMEC 2016 in Copenhagen. The rest of the team, along with Federico Toja, Director of European Chapter Business and Darren Temple, Chief Business Development Officer, visited a few offsite venues including: Hotel Andalucia Center, host venue for the European Chapter Business Summit (ECBS), to be co-located with EMEC for the third year in a row. Carmen de los Mártires, a beautiful palace and gardens situated near the Alhambra and a fitting location for the Leadership Dinner (by invitation only). Cortijo de Enmedio, a beautiful Andalusian farmhouse located on the outskirts of the city that opened this year and will be the perfect spot for the Welcome Reception. That evening, the team reunited at Restaurante Alameda, part of the same company that runs Cortijo de Enmedio, to sample an amazing tasting menu of proposed appetizers and main dishes for the Welcome Reception, along with some local Spanish wine. The consensus was unanimous: the food and drink is delicious and is sure to impress participants. In between meetings, there were some great discussions about the overall design of the conference. Back in June, Team MPI and the entire EMEC17 host committee joined together in Granada for a two-day strategy meeting using the Event Model Canvas, facilitated by one of its creators and long-time MPI member, Roel Frissen. Together they looked at three key stakeholder groups: MPI members who are not or no longer attending EMEC (approximately 85% of the European membership), suppliers and sponsors, who’s support makes this conference possible, and the host destination/host committee. The discussion then focused on what behaviours EMEC should change for each of these stakeholder groups in order to increase their ROI. Some of the updates being made as a result of this exercise include a new and improved educational promise featuring distinct session types and innovative formats, a simplified and value-focused sponsorship prospectus that builds on the success of the Hosted Buyer Programme first introduced at EMEC 2015 in Krakow, and a totally redesigned conference website to be launched in mid November. Plans are also underway for a special promotion during ibtm world in Barcelona. To stay up-to-date, please register your interest in EMEC17 and you will be the first to know when both the registration and website goes live! Make sure to follow @MPI on Twitter and tag your social media posts with #EMEC17. Written by Andrew Walker, Manager Events - Meeting Professionals International...
3 Oct 2016 3 ways to enhance your professional skills with MPI Academy
If your goal is to enhance your career, education plays a key role. The MPI Academy provides three ways you can gain the professional skills you need to rise above the competition: through webinars, in-person educational events and on-demand online courses. MPI Academy courses are open to everyone regardless of industry tenure, title or skill level. You’ll want to first identify what training or education is right for you, by using the Professional Development Roadmap.  If you’re an MPI Member, you can attend the webinars for free and register for on-demand or in-person courses at a significant discount. The MPI Foundation also accepts applications for educational and event scholarships year-round. Check here for dates and info. Upcoming webinars 4 October: Visioneering the Meeting Room of the Future 11 October: Ask CIC 27 October: Medical Meeting Trends and Changes Affecting Our Industry 8 November: Wi-Fi That Works 15 November: Meetings Outlook: A Deep Dive into the Latest Business Trends 17 November: An Industry in Flux: Meetings After the U.S. Presidential Election 29 November: It’s All About the Experience, Nothing More Click here to learn more and register. On-demand education MPI is offering four on-demand certificate classes that you can take at your own pace: Healthcare Meeting Compliance Certificate (HMCC) Sustainable Meeting Professional Certificate (SMPC) Meetings and Events at Sea Venue Sales Certificate You also can view education from past EMEC (European Meetings & Events Conference) and WEC (World Education Conference) events here free of charge. Upcoming educational events In addition to signature educational events, such as EMEC and WEC, you can take certificate courses with the MPI Academy year-round. Don’t forget: MPI Foundation scholarships can help defray the cost of tuition and travel. Do you want to create a version of an MPI educational program in your native language? Ask us about licensing the content so you can customize education for your chapter and local market. Check the MPI Academy site frequently for updates and dates. By Kristi Casey Sanders, DES - MPI Director of Professional Development ...
26 Sep 2016 New findings on sustainable events to be presented at Sustainable Brands Copenhagen
Sustainable Brands® is a global community of brand innovators - such as Unilever, Coca Cola, UPS, Disney, IKEA, LEGO, Novozymes, NovoNordisk and Carlson Rezidor - who are shaping the future of commerce worldwide. Counting over one million business leaders from around the globe, its mission is to empower more brands to prosper by leading the way to a better world. Every year Sustainable Brands arrange multiple conferences around the world and this year’s Northern European conference takes place in Copenhagen from September 26-28. At the conference in Copenhagen, speakers and experts will share latest knowhow on how and why brands work with sustainability including a session on connecting the links between being sustainability driven and holding events. The session presents both new findings on brand attitudes towards sustainable events and an interactive, co-creation workshop on how brands can elevate their efforts through their events. Fiona Pelham, Meeting Professionals International’s Global Board Chair and Managing Director of Positive Impact who is co-facilitating the sessions commented on their survey findings so far: “Many brands are aware of the creative impact of their events and interested to learn how they can have a positive social and environmental impact at the same time. Brands who truly understand the world-changing impact their events can have already talk about a time when a sustainable event will be the norm. The most obvious challenges to creating a sustainable event are cost, innovation and time. These factors should disappear as the market for low negative impact innovations develops.”  The second facilitator Ulrika Mårtensson, Meeting Professionals International’s Denmark Chapter President and Head of Communications – meetings & conventions in Wonderful Copenhagen CVB, commented: “As a communications professional I find it obvious for brands who work dedicated with CSR and sustainability to showcase their efforts in any event - from product launches to employee kick-offs and conferences. It is a unique opportunity to engage your ‘audience’ and build brand reputation. I have attended numerous events focusing on green or sustainable topics or products conducted in a non-sustainable way leaving you as an attendee with an unclear idea of the brand profile and engagement.” The session will present leading experts on sustainable event management and suppliers to events such as Paul Salinger from Oracle World, Guy Bigwood from MCI Sustainability Group, Lee Spivak from Waste Management Inc., Oliver Maxwell from ByBi (CityBee), Michael Stausholm from Sprout, Trine Richter from Hotel GHS, Green Solution House and Inge Huijbrechts from Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group. With its vast cycling culture, green city solutions, large supply of environmentally-friendly hotels, venues and restaurants, extensive clean tech cluster and a track-record of eco-certifying international mega-events, Copenhagen will create an ideal backdrop for the conference. When Copenhagen was announced as the host city for Sustainable Brands 2016, the founder and CEO of Sustainable Brands KoAnn Vikoren Skrzyniarz, said: "As a community of innovators focused on advancing the role of brands in shaping a flourishing future, we couldn’t be more excited to convene our Northern European Sustainable Brands community in Copenhagen in 2016. We feel that a city known for its devotion to sustainable business practices and the laudable goal of becoming the world’s first CO2 neutral capital by 2025 is a perfect location to convene an ecosystem of business leaders and organisations for conversations on sustainability-led brand innovation." Sustainable Brands ’16 Copenhagen will be staged at the Carlson Rezidor property Radisson Blu Scandinavia Hotel in Copenhagen. Carlson Rezidor - known as a frontrunner within sustainable hotel management – recently signed up as a member of the Sustainable Brands Corporate Member community. The MCI Group was responsible for bringing the conference to Copenhagen in close cooperation with Sustainable Brands, Carlson Rezidor and Wonderful Copenhagen. The two sessions will be held on September 27th. This curation article is from Copenhagn Convention Bureau newsletter...
19 Sep 2016 Chapter President's Voice: Héctor A. Venegas MPI Germany Chapter
Could you give us a brief overview of your background and how did you start your career in the Meeting Industry? I was born in Santiago de Chile and raised in different countries on this planet. I always thought that I would be working in an international field. Having learned 5 different languages, I thought Law would be the right way. So I studied Law at the University of Cologne. To be able to pay for Law School I had to work. After some time in the hotel business, I found the events industry and fell in love with it immediately. So after graduating Law School I did what I had to do: I founded an event planning company. How has your active MPI membership affected your professional career? I came across MPI quite early in my career and became a member soon. I soon realized that I could get the best benefit out of it by being actively involved. My personal and professional network became bigger and bigger, and soon learned what it means to be in this community. I learned so much from fellow members and had the pleasure to help others within this community. Giving and receiving is easy along the fellow members. New collaborations and alliances were built and whole new ways of business were made. What is the value for you to be a chapter leader volunteering for board position? It is a tough “job” besides your real job, that should not be forgotten. But it can open some doors. Be it because you are in a leading role and have to learn how to lead, which you can apply on your paid job, or because you get to meet people you would have never met without being in the position you are in. What is your current position and role in the industry? I am the current CEO of SwarmWorks Ltd., a company dedicated on actively involving attendees of meetings and events.There are so many events where the main characters are ingnored and forgotten: It’s the attendee. The attendee is the one we are doing the event for. It’s for the attendee that hundreds of thousands of dollars are spent every year. So why would we forget about this person?If we just have a show from the stage to the attedees we will reduce them to be mere spectators and audience. That is not enough.We need to turn them into participants, make them actively involved.There are so many ways tio get there and every event or meeting needs another way of involvement, but it needs to be done. Tell us more about how you keep up with innovations I do visit as much of international events as I can manage in my schedule. MPI events like EMEC, WEC or industry exhibitions like IMEX and IBTM are the meeting points of the industry.If you want to get e feeling how the industry is developing and want to learn new ideas, this would be the places to be.Every time I visit those events, I come back with new impulses and ideas. Beside that you get to meet a lot of former colleagues and friends and get to know new ones. What’s new with the MPI Germany Chapter and what are the main objectives for the future? We are structured in regions, as the country is big and people in Germany don't tend to travel a lot. So we heve to be close to the members in those regions, where we do our edicationals. Recently we have reopened two regions that were long in “sleeping mode”. Those are the regions middle (Frankfurt) and south (Munich). I’m very proud that we managed to revitalize those regions, as they are quite important to the industry. What advice would you give to young professionals beginning their careers in the Meeting and Event Industry? Believe in yourself and try to get a good network. It is a very versatile industry. If you believe too much in competition, you will be competed and defeated, if you accept that you might have strong fields and someone else might have others, you will succeed.If you give a lot you will receive even more. ...
12 Sep 2016 MPI Finland Chapter gets the word out: Economic growth through international events
Finland is the promised land of engineers where heavy industries and ICT sector are traditionally highly appreciated. Only the past recession years have given a little attention to the service sector due to its employment effect. However there is lack of understanding for the meeting industry. In Finland we are not at the stage, in which our sector is evaluated by hotel nights and other logistics data. Our existence is barely known; in other words the timing is perfect to start building the image. With the initiative of MPI Finland Chapter an event headed by the Finnish Minister for Foreign Trade and MPI International Board Chair Fiona Pelham was organized last Friday, September 2, 2016. “Economic growth for Finland through international business events and congresses” was the title for the 2-hours “invitation-only” conference. Our target was to invite people at CEO level from various business sectors, top politicians and university rectors. We wanted to get to an action plan from day one as the meeting industry supports the knowledge economy! There was big interest for the session; 40 persons had registered in it within two hours of sending the invitations out. The meeting room was easily filled up, but the participants were mainly from the event sector. However the first steps were taken. The program started with a brisk presentation of Minister for Foreign Trade Kai Mykkanen, who arrived to the venue directly from budget negotiations. The negotiations might have taken 40 hours, but the new minister had really studied the topic, had called the heads of Finnish Trade promotion offices abroad and spoke without written notes, which impressed us. Real working tools were offered and some possible co-operation forms were examined. For example currently the meetings for official foreign trade delegations to Finland lack an excitement that the participants of this event could easily supply. The following two speakers also brought some ingredients for future action; the economic sectors which official Finland is actively promoting abroad should be connected to international events. Either by bringing existing professional congresses to Finland or by organizing events from scratch in order to make them more special. Having no economic data the value of our sector is not appreciated; this is why the participants agreed to start collecting figures more organized. Our very own MPI-Star Fiona Pelham, Chair of the IBOD was the main speaker besides minister Mykkanen. She presented with her positive charisma impressive M&I figures of the MPI Economic Impact studies from Canada, U.K and U.S. For example her slide with “30% of the total visitors to the U.K are meetings and conference delegates” was distributed in social media with cheering comments. The challenges to promote the M&I sector was expressed. Fiona told us that she sees the same issue around the globe, but together we can work for a change! All in all the event was two hours well used. It was organized in co-operation with Finland Convention Bureau, Visit Helsinki, Visit Espoo, Travel Experience (local DMC), Finlandia Hall and Conference Network Finland. Now it is the time for private actors and the MPI Finland board to take the leadership for follow-up and get some of the great wordings for action.   Written by Paula Blomster, MPI Finland President...
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