5 Sep 2016 Take back control
by Annette Gregg, CMM, MBA In today’s business climate, it’s common for employees to be carrying the workload of more than one person—and that new normal isn’t likely to change. As these pressures increase, it’s even more important that we are disciplined in how we invest our time at work. Mastery of focus, information management and communication will not only help us get more done with our time, but also enables us to focus on areas that have the most impact. “Efficiency is doing things right. Effectiveness is doing the right things,” said management consultant Peter Drucker. This effectiveness becomes a powerful aspect of our professional brands and can be a key differentiator in advancing our careers. Guarding Your Time and Finding White Space In The New Division of Labor: How Computers Are Creating the Next Job Market, Robert Murnane describes how computers have automated many routine job processes and notes that human skills such as expert thinking (“solving new problems for which there are no routine solutions”) and complex communication (“explaining a particular interpretation of information”) are even more valuable. To grow in our careers, we need to be able to be critical thinkers, and we aren’t able to do this if our days are spent only doing routine work or when our brains are constantly interrupted with multi-tasking. We need to find ways to manage our time to balance the need for meetings, tasks and, most importantly, time to focus on more strategic projects that require deeper thinking. Taking Control of Email Email management is a critical business skill and reflects on our professional brand. Because we work in cultures where we feel pressured to respond quickly, our inboxes become our daily task lists. Your email inbox isn’t meant to be treated as a filing place or a to-do list, but that’s commonly how employees manage their workload. Researcher Gloria Mark found that employees check their email on average 74 times per day. She advises companies to offer email-free times throughout the day to give staff time for project work. When working on email, it’s important to manage the volume and keep your inbox clean by deciding to either delete, delegate, file or assign it as a task. Meetings: It’s Your Choice If you are in a company culture that is meeting heavy, this can be a common threat to your productivity. Face-to-face interaction is critical, but how we manage our time in meetings is up to us. The first question to ask: Is a meeting really necessary? Can we solve this issue with a phone call or singular conversation instead? If you’ve been invited to a meeting, it’s your choice whether or not to attend. Ask for clarification before committing to attend, and if your opinion or group is already represented, you may decide that you don’t need to attend. As the meeting owner, it’s our responsibility to manage it effectively. Send out a written agenda, with any pre-reading to be done in advance so the time together is used for dialogue and not review of background information. Along with an agenda, be clear about the purpose and expectations of the meeting. And try reducing the time to 30 minutes to increase the efficiency of the meeting. Clear Communication Much time is wasted because we are unclear on expectations. In both written and verbal communication, we need to clarify relevant information so that people are empowered to act. As a conversation or meeting is ending, be sure someone restates next steps, who will do the action and important due dates and timing. Similarly, long and disorganized emails often obscure the message for our reader. We can help them discern the key messages by writing shorter emails and by clarifying actions and due dates at the beginning of the message or in the subject line. A powerful tool in creating more effective communication is committing to direct conversations and conflict resolution. Much time is wasted with circuitous conversations about other people or misinterpretation of messages. Cultivating a culture of brave, honest and direct communication will not only save time, but create a healthier and more authentic workplace—and a healthier work environment is probably the most effective tool of all. Read the full article and more interesting topics on our MPI blog on mpiweb.org   ...
29 Aug 2016 Good security is common sense
by Alex Hannaford Chris Hagon, a former royalty protection officer with London's Metropolitan Police Service, is now a managing partner with the IMG Group, a global security firm based in Florida. He says the key to establishing good security is to look at barriers. "We introduce preventive measures, which you have to get through as you get closer to the target," he says. "When I was working for the royal family we had an outer ring of police controlling access to the location, but then there are other steps in between: searching people, looking at bags—and all of those are different barriers that separate the threat from the action." Hagon says you can apply that same principle to everything—from executive protection to meetings. For security to be effective, organizers need to think through all possible contingencies. "And this requires an understanding of all the threats there could be," he says. "If you don't construct that in your mind, you can't come up with preventive measures." It's imperative to conduct a thorough risk assessment. Are there threats against the meeting itself, the topic being discussed or the executives attending? If so, you need to consider additional measures to counter those perceived threats, Hagon says. "Some years ago I was asked to go to a function with [Princess] Diana and [Prince] Charles at the Astoria theater in London. They were going to see a concert by Duran Duran and the Dire Straits," he says. "I went to the venue two days before and got the local police to seal off the place. I got dogs in and did a thorough search. I found nothing. But what I discovered later on from the security services was that an informant had told them that the IRA had intended to place an explosive device at that concert. So there's an example of actually employing proper preventive measures even though there was no additional definitive threat. We took steps. And only in retrospect did we discover it worked." Hagon says good security is common sense. "You interview people taking part in the meeting, get to the bottom of any issues that could be worrying them and speak to the CEO," he says. "What does he or she know that might be a danger to the company or to individuals? Are there any unpleasant lawsuits? Have there been any demonstrations because of something the company is doing? The more you analyze the meeting, what it's about and who's attending, the more solutions there are." Hagon says security must be integrated into the overall planning of a meeting from the outset. "It may be a minor issue or it may be a major issue that threatens people's lives," he says. "But if you bear in mind the security component when you begin to plan the meeting, it'll mitigate the risk." Conduct a risk assessment, hire a security firm, communicate with members or delegates and speak to local law enforcement. Good intelligence ahead of time is vital, and local law enforcement could be the best source. "In America, local police departments usually have enough resources to go straight in and deal with any situation that arises," he says. "They don't want this thing to drag on longer than it should. So it's very useful to involve local police from the outset." Hagon also recommends having a good medical plan for appropriate treatment/evacuation, as well as providing security awareness tips for delegates at the meeting—are there any "no go" zones? If someone's in trouble, whom should they call? Please read the full article about security and contingency planning for destinations—including Dallas and Cologne, Germany—in the September issue of The Meeting Professional and a lot of other interessting articles in our MPI Blog on www.mpiweb.org.  ...
23 Aug 2016 Case Study: MPI Spain renews its management board
What is happening at MPI Spain? The New Board of Directors was established the past 6th of July 2016 in Madrid. Led by Angeles Moreno as the President, the new management board has been constituted with the objective to position MPI as the association of reference for professionals within the industry in this country, and also to lead this chapter to the next level in the following years. The new directors on the Board, coming from different points of the Spanish geography and from different fields within the industry, will provide a greater diversity not only geographically but also professionally. MPI Recognition in Spain The priority of the Board is to encourage the communication with MPI Spain members through the agenda of its educational sessions (24 annual actions in several Spanish cities), networking events and its new recruitment plan using strategic alliances which will engage the pertinent institutional authorities and other industry associations. Being “MPI member” has to be considered as a “MUST” among professionals in the management of meetings and events industry. Entrepreneurs Event With the objective of encourage the insertion of new companies in the industry, MPI Spain is working on the “First Encounter for Entrepreneurs of the Meetings & Events Industry” which will allow the interchange of experiences between them and the consolidated and traditional companies. The selected ones, will present their projects to a team of experts with access to credit lines and investors.  MPI Spain will count as well with a team of advisors that will help scaling businesses internationally and will give access to European support for entrepreneurs. Young MPI Professionals Network. Within this year 2016, MPI Spain will launch the “First Young Professionals Forum MPI”. We will develop specific training workshops for young professionals, Seminars and professional Certifications and meetings with prestigious mentors... and we will be creating a special program for them to attend to the EMEC 2017. EMEC17 One of the main challenges of this year for the New Board is without a doubt the Organization and Promotion of EMEC17. It is certainly a great opportunity for the Spanish Chapter to be the host of this unique event with European level. The attendees will have numerous opportunities for networking, develop professional relationships with other members and benefit from an extensive education program with an innovative content. The event will take place in a unique setting as the wonderful city of Granada.  ...
15 Aug 2016 Meetings Outlook - Summer 2016 Edition is out now!
Smart marketing, flexibility, informed negotiation skills and even last-minute risks are among the tactics and tools necessary to craft successful business in today’s market. MPI’s latest Meetings Outlook survey, found that the seller’s market is changing, with hotels and venues getting clearer on the sectors of clients with whom they want to do business and more precisely targeting their marketing to reflect this. “What we’re seeing is hotels and venues becoming more sophisticated in their target market definition and doing a better job of tracking their target market customers and accepting the types of business for which they are best suited,” says Bill Voegeli (MPI Georgia Chapter), president of Association Insights, the Atlanta-area research firm that conducts the survey. “You’ll find hotels and venues turning away customers with whom they used to work in favor of customers for whom they can do a better job or possibly enjoy a higher yield.” The trends could ultimately benefit the meeting and event industry overall, according to Voegeli. “It bodes very well for the industry long term because the hotels and venues are taking time to better define and understand whom they want to work with and better understand whom they serve the best,” he says. Barry Jones (MPI Brazil Chapter), who does strategic meetings management for the nonprofit organization FamilyLife in Little Rock, Ark., has found that in the current climate, venues are asking more of organizers.  “This is forcing us to negotiate certain points harder, try to suggest different options that are lower-cost and help our clients determine how their budget can support a reduced program,” he says. With venues charging higher prices, meeting organizers are having to adjust their expectations, too, the survey found. MaryEllen Parmer, CMP (MPI Middle Pennsylvania Chapter), who coordinates and oversees conferences for PWW Media, commented that one of her current challenges is “going to a seller’s market and trying to still meet the needs of the attendees.” Suppliers, too, are feeling the squeeze. “Events and meetings are still very last-minute in regards to signing off and planning details,” says a supplier, who sought anonymity. “Dates for meetings and events are normally planned in an acceptable time frame, but confirming and planning details are often last minute and prevent suppliers from delivering their very best in customer service and pricing.” Nonetheless, some planners are making the most of the seller’s market, pursuing last-minute bookings when and where rooms are available and getting multiple venues to compete for the business to get a lower rate than would be expected, the survey found. Suppliers are aware that this is being done and are actively participating in it. TECHNOLOGY MARCHES ON In a trend that continues to gain momentum, technological innovation continues to disrupt meetings, with planners increasingly expecting new technology to be part of the mix. For instance, the survey found that 55 percent of respondents expect virtual attendance at meetings to rise. In keeping with this trend, some industry professionals are looking for budgets not simply for technology, but for experimenting with new approaches. One factor that is driving this is demand from organizers and attendees. “Everyone wants all information electronically using Dropbox for handouts, sending evaluations electronically and [having] schedules easily accessed on smartphones,” says Barbara Louis, CMP (MPI Minnesota Chapter),CEO at Best Meetings Inc. in Bloomington, Minn. Buhl is seeing more use of technology, videoconferencing and webstreaming to reduce travel and increase attendee participation. “For these meetings to be successful [the technology] needs to become an integrated part of the meeting, not an add-on,” she says. Though many meeting organizers are putting technology front and center, providers say they still have some educating to do, when it comes to integrating it successfully into meetings. ZIKA FEARS REMAIN IN CHECK Although Zika and terrorism fears have been cited as major concerns, they were not having a major impact on destination choice. Sharon Schenk, CMP (MPI New England Chapter), director, conventions and event management at CCA Global Partners Inc, said: "Safety is the most important concern to our team. I try to keep up-to-date on the virus and build our contingency plan accordingly. I’m taking the media hype with a grain of salt. It’s a very delicate balance. You have to look at the odds." According to the report, around 30% of respondents are avoiding destinations that have laws prohibiting universal restroom use, while 19% refuse to visit with regions with liberal handgun or weapons laws. Download here the full report. The MPI in Europe Team            ...
8 Aug 2016 Chapter President's Voice: Angeles Moreno MPI Spain Chapter
1 – Could you give us a brief overview of your professional background and how did you start your career in the Meeting Industry? Since a child I had very international education, German school in different cities and afterwards British school in Madrid. I then studied Tourism Management at university and my interest for tourism probably was because I grew up in the Canary Islands where tourism is the most important industry. After Tourism I reinforced my education with an MBA. My professional career started in the hospitality field working in Sales & Marketing for NH Hotels. I was missing Project management so I then changed my path to the event management sector where I worked for 2 of the best event management agencies in Spain. But I had always in my mind to set up my own business; hence I started setting up a web platform to organize events on line. The online world was not very nice to me and we faced the worldwide “.com crisis” only 1 year after I started my business. It was difficult to survive… After having tested the entrepreneur excitement it was impossible for me to go back to a regular company so I decided to start again a new project. This time not on line but an extraordinary event management company. This was 15 years ago and we are still in the run. Now internationally, with several offices worldwide and a team of professionals I have the great honour to lead every day.  2 – How has your MPI membership affected your professional career? When I started my career, I knew MPI was the only association in our sector with global and plural ADN. MPI is a community of professionals in different fields in our industry, which could give me a wider scope of the profession I wanted to succeed in. That was the main reason why I joined MPI back in 2006. Nowadays being part of the board at MPI Spain offers me the opportunity to give back to my industry and do something for my sector and of course extends my personal career development to thousands of opportunities. 3 - What’s new with the Chapter and what are the goals that you would like to achieve with the Spanish Chapter in the coming months? New in the Chapter is that we are thinking very strategic and we have increased our pro activeness, as our main goal is to position MPI as the top plural association in Spain. We are career home to learn and gain professional development in all areas and important we are not competing but complementing other sectorial associations in our country.  Our communication efforts will be based on this global concept of MPI. Because we firmly believe in future generations, we have in our strategic plans for this year to organize the first edition of the “Meetings & Events entrepreneurs get together” with educational programs and access to finance and investment encounters. Another great challenge will be to set up the first MPI Spain Young Professionals network. Membership is the first thing for all associations and we will be actively working as Board on membership programs to increase all different categories of members: suppliers and planners. We have also a high quality and extensive Educational program with 22 sessions plus seminars, with certification in different cities in Spain, to network with our members. 4 – What piece of advice would you give to young professionals starting a career in the Meeting and Event Industry? If there is a dream to lead and stand out as a professional in the Meetings & Events industry I would definitely encourage them to join MPI and be actively involved and connected, taking advantage of the opportunities which are open to Young professionals. Getting involved in networking activities to connect with as many industry colleagues as possible and build strong connections. Get education and future trend updates is also crucial for their professional successful evolution.    ...
1 Aug 2016 The End Game: Manifesto on the meetings industry
“We need to stop looking at the symptoms and identify the source of the problem," says Oscar Cerezales, COO of MCI Group Asia Pacific and former MPI President (MPI Spain) as he zooms right into the heart of the matter. "There is no point in flocking like sheep to the same stress points and harping on the same micro issues that defeat progress in the bigger context." The market is fragmenting, consolidating and evolving in business models. With this shifting of tectonic plates, the meetings landscape drastically changes, and Oscar emphasizes the need for meeting planners to realize they will not survive ­ if they don't adapt and evolve. "Today, there may be thousands of meeting planners, but companies are consolidating and hiring big agencies and market niche­ driven agencies. Those planners that are wedged in the middle will be the ones suffering if they don't relook their business models and approach. They have to move beyond the tactical and transactional and not harp on reduced budgets and management fees. These topics are not important at all in the overall scheme of things," he asserts. Oscar doesn't mince his words, telling it point blank with a quiet confidence that belies a big personality on stage. Is the concept of meetings being redefined and in what way? When you talk about meetings, you are not just talking about meetings. You are actually talking about your communities and how to engage them. And that is becoming difficult as the market fragments. There is an explosive increase in the number of events being held, but they are getting smaller and they are turning into hybrids with virtual online platforms. How does that impact tourism boards and CVBs? For example, IT or FMCG companies organize many events and as the number increases, they are looking at market­ driven events to engage specific communities such as YouTube fans. Ultimately, that is the ROI. To engage the entire spectrum of their market audience. How would a CVB then attract 500 of such hybrid events as compared to 100 conferences and exhibitions? How do you define success in this new meetings context? I don't just want to meet you once when you pay a visit to my booth at an exhibition. I want to talk to my customers over 365 days, not just one day. I want to increase my touch points and maximize my impact. In order for that to happen, we have to move beyond just that physical event and think about what it means to engage your communities. With technology as an enabler, this is becoming a reality. What then are the challenges that stand in the way? Rather than refer to them as challenges, I prefer to reframe the perspective and call them game changers. Market fragmentation is one ­ which I talked about. The other is market consolidation. Vendors, agencies, suppliers, hotels, clients. They are all consolidating. There is a paradigm shift in mindsets and business models. For example, where there used to be 20 pharmaceutical companies for 75 percent of the market, there are now just a few for the same share. There is also another important: the Chief Marketing Officer. He is the one paying for the party. He decides everything and he has this message: I want to build up communities and fans around my company and my products and services so that they will spread the message and be my brand ambassadors. They need these communities to be online via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc, but also offline via meetings, roadshows and conferences.   So how does this directive differ from past ones other than the fact that online platforms are now important? What's different is in the budget. In the past, there were separate budgets. Now they have one budget for a coordinated and integrated marketing plan that includes above the line, below the line, off-line and on-line platforms. And they want to track every single dollar they spend and know exactly where it goes. They also want to track their communities and know what they twittered, what they posted on Facebook or LinkedIn, whether they visited their exhibition, what they bought, etc. With this market intelligence, they will become more efficient and effective in meeting end goals. Meeting planners have to pay attention to this because companies now have bigger marketing budgets, but they are spending more strategically. So there is a need to align mindsets and achieve goals in a seamless connection. How should meeting planners get their game on for the future? Looking at what I said earlier, meeting planners then need to look at the big picture and consider the environment that those game changers are operating within.   We are constantly searching for interesting articles and hope you enjoyed this M&C Magazine interview with Oscar Cerezales by Esther Faith Lew (done a couple of month) as much as we did. Happy summer to you! Your MPI Europe Team   ...
25 Jul 2016 MPI Belgium is proud to announce that it has received its first award!
The MPI Belgium Chapter is this year’s winner of the RISE Award (Recognizing Industry Success and Excellence) for “Marketplace Excellence”. The Chapter was honored at the annual MPI RISE Awards Presentation and Luncheon during the association’s 2016 World Education Congress (WEC) in Atlantic City. “Congratulations to the 2016 RISE Awards recipients,” said Paul Van Deventer, president and CEO of MPI. “We salute each of these leaders who were nominated by their peers for outstanding contributions and performance. Their achievements will be recognized within our global community for years to come.” The RISE Award for Marketplace Excellence was presented to the MPI Belgium Chapter for providing exceptional business exchanges for its members. The chapter approached its annual BE Conference differently, including sponsors and partners in the planning process and during the event. Their new approach helped elevate the connection between attendees and their partners and created business opportunities between their members. Since the successful conference, MPI Belgium has also seen growth in its chapter involvement from its members. Word from the Belgium Chapter leaders: We are so proud to receive the global MPI RISE Award for Marketplace Excellence at #WEC16. Due to the hard work of our team of MICE Professionals and the support of our members, partners and sponsors, MPI Belgium is stronger than before. This award is our motivation to grow to an even larger community, to raise brand awareness and to get more volunteers involved. Members, volunteers, stakeholders, MPI HQ, MPI Foundation, friends and family thank you for your support, your patience and recognition. Written by MPI Belgium About the Rise Award: The MPI’s Recognizing Industry Success and Excellence (RISE) Awards are prestigious awards presented yearly that recognize and honor individual, community and organizational achievements for their innovation, global transferability, impact and influence....
18 Jul 2016 Event Design in practice for EMEC17!
On June 21st and 22nd, Granada - Spain was the stunning backdrop of the EMEC17 Strategy Meeting. A meeting that enabled core team members of MPI along with the Granada Host Committee to work collaboratively on the design of the EMEC17 conference, its objectives and a joint understanding of what success looks like. Different than usual… The typical MPI Events planning process starts with a kick-off meeting with our new Host committee and an internal evaluation meeting. After that all departments kick into action and a conference begins to take shape. Building upon learning’s from last year in Copenhagen, this year the team however initiated a 2 day strategy meeting with our Granada Host committee. We used the Event Model Canvas tool to take a collaborative and systematic approach to the EMEC17 Event Design. Why… This joint learning experience ensured that we now have a shared vision of what this event SHOULD and SHOULD NOT be. It also created a solid foundation of trust on which to build out the narrative for the event and manage the challenges that will inevitable come our way. We have now started our planning process with dialogue and have a joint understanding of next steps in order to deliver a successful event. Roel Frissen, co-creator of the #EventCanvas, facilitated the process. Using the Stakeholder Alignment Canvas the team discussed stakeholders involved and selected the stakeholders the team wanted to delight. In itself that was a powerful exercise; knowing who to design for is crucial for the design process. The team designed EMEC17 from the perspective of three main stakeholders and carefully dissected the stakeholder perspectives to establish the Event Delta; articulating the behaviour change EMEC17 should cause for these stakeholders. Based on the Event Delta the team came up with several ideas which eventually merged into different prototypes to change behaviour. To innovate and improve events you need a tool: EventCanvas is a strategic management template to design events. The EventCanvas provides a common language for events which allows you to have a meaningful conversation with all parties involved, from event owner to supplier. A tool to design better events. The canvas will be the center piece of the programme on 25, 26 and 27 August at the University of Amsterdam, where you will work closely together with professionals (from 6 different countries and counting) with passion for marketing, content and events. Get MPI education in Amsterdam this Summer, become Certified Event Designer and gain 24 clock hours to renew your CMP. Click here to find more information about the Event Design Certificate Program.  ...
11 Jul 2016 A brand new testing ground for the Event Industry: MPI Content !
On the 5th of July, Sugar City Venue, on the outskirts of Amsterdam was the ravishing decor of MPI the Netherlands’ annual congress called Content. An event where limits of the (im)possible are sought and maybe even passed. The event forms a testing ground where the visitor will be inspired with new concepts and ideas for their own events. Different from all else Before as well as during the event, the over 200 participants where in charge of the Content. They had a direct influence on the offer of speakers. From a pool of nearly 100 speakers who took part in the Keynote Challenge, 20 were preselected. Of them 5 were selected by the organising committee, from the remaining 15 candidate speakers, the participants choose the other 5. At the event, each of the 10 candidate speakers was given 5 minutes to pitch for the Keynote. Quite exciting for the candidates, because the winners got to divide 75% of the ticket revenue. Keynote Speech Hélène Oosterhuis was chosen to present her Keynote Speech of 45 minutes. Hélène told us a real story - without the use of Powerpoint slides - about her life and about being yourself in a successful way. Parallel Sessions The numbers 2 through 5 were chosen to present the parallel sessions. Rudy van Beurden, Jean-Marc Bilderbeek, Cyriel Kortleven and Patrick van der Pijl accepted the challenge. Simultaneously on the stage, they gave a 20 minute presentation. The audience could tune in to the speaker of their choice by means of headsets. Food Concept Also regarding Food and Beverages the choice was up to the participants. Coffee, tea and water were provided. Food trucks complemented a wide offer of additional catering options. Conclusion Many enthousiastic participants, with many new faces shared their experiences both live and on Social Media. Reactions like “Content Rocks”, “I am on the edge of my seat” and “Testing ground with 4 simultaneous speakers and we the participants can switch between them with our headsets” as well as “And we have started. An event with a completely different approach” are an enormous source of pride and recognition for the organising committee. Check the link for more reactions (in Dutch): https://content.events/ MPI Content was made possible through a number of unique cooperations with Partners like Sugar City, ACS, Sendsteps, DoubleDutch, Fraai, JMT The Food Line Up and many others. Wrritten by Rob Martens, VP Communication MPI The Netherlands. *Pictures taken by “Ramon van Jaarsveld – Clickshots”...
4 Jul 2016 83% of UK's event professionals do not think the leave vote will be positive for the industry !
C&IT asked the industry to outline the pros and cons of the 'leave' vote, and while the majority of event professionals are concerned about the short-term uncertainty, some were able to find positives. Negatives: Skills Shortage "I think there are multiple concerns around skills shortage, economic impact, and reduced foreign investment that will impact the events industry," said Alan Newton, founder and COO at Eventopedia. "In terms of skills shortage, let's be clear, we're not going to be losing tens of thousands of workers overnight, but the statistics show that we're an industry heavily reliant upon migrant workers, with the figure as high as 60% in London. More than a third of those workers are in skilled or managerial roles, so we're talking about a generation before we can reasonably introduce the required change in culture, education, and training to plug the gap, and we'll be missing the cultural advantages that go with having an immigrant workforce." Greater competition from European agencies "I feel leaving the EU might make competing for European events business more difficult and result in some European HQs moving out of London and using local event agencies for their requirements," said Sam Robson, group events director at The Appointment Group. Value of sterling dropping "Any outbound events where the budget is held in the UK will also be heavily impacted by the sharp loss in the value of sterling, which may lead to some events being curtailed or cancelled due to increased budgetary pressure," said Newton.  Uncertainty in the economy "The major concern about the Brexit from a client point of view is the uncertainty it might bring to the economy," said Shaun Casey, head of events at BI WORLDWIDE. "Clearly a vast majority of MICE spend is considered to be discretionary spend and this might be frozen on a wait-and-see basis. Hence, there could be pressure to postpone commitment and payments." Knee-jerk market responses "The markets were informing us pre-vote that they were not favouring Brexit and they've certainly responded in that manner this morning," said Newton. "However, we also know that markets can have knee-jerk responses before recovering, so we have to be patient and allow the dust to settle. This level of uncertainty will, in the short to medium term, have a big negative impact and I'd say all budgetary targets for this year probably have to be revisited.  Leave vote could see a return to export carnets and restrictions Evcom chairman Steve Garvey says a main concern of Brexit is how it will impact on the movement of people, goods and services around Europe. If export carnets or restrictions of the past return, or visas for European travel introduced, it could have a huge impact on UK companies delivering events within the EU. "We believe it is vital to continue to allow the free movement of people, capital, goods and services between the UK and the rest of Europe. While the UK will remain a member of the EU for some time, it is essential that our members are able to deliver events and produce screen content in the EU after the Brexit process is completed," said Garvey. Positives:  A chance to shape things in the industry’s interest Anita Lowe, founder and chief executive of Venues and Events International, said: "Now is the time to look at what our strategy needs to be. The most important thing we need to do is get the right negotiators involved on behalf of ourselves. They need to come from the events industry itself, some our industry leaders. "We need to take time to find the right negotiators on behalf of the country - not just politicians, but industry leaders too, to get the right terms for us. If we get the right people on the panel it could be positive for the industry in that we have independence in certain areas we didn’t before. The UK is still a powerhouse and this can give us opportunities, it might be a strong, positive thing." International companies will still work with us "We won’t come out of EU straight away, we’re now saying negotiations will start in October and we won't invoke Article 50 right away. It might take a couple of years," said Lowe. "This morning, Mark Carney from The Bank of England said there were funds in place to protect us and we need to keep the market as firm as possible, so businesses will continue doing what they're doing. My feelings are that we haven’t had companies say they’re not doing stuff, we are still getting lots of enquires, our company name says 'International' and we work with global partners who are still going to continue to do their business with us. As an industry we just need to confront this with positivity." Working with countries outside the EU "Perhaps in the long term, leaving might mean we have stronger trading relationships with countries outside of Europe, which may mean we can forge closer links with other emerging economies," said Robson. "On our own we might have better trading relationships with India, China, South America and the US, which could be a positive that comes out of us leaving; it has given us that opportunity." Sterling drop could be attractive In the short term at least, the value of the sterling has fallen sharply, meaning anyone coming to the UK will get better value for money. This may also make it more expensive for those going to US or EU as the weak pound will give them less for their money. This could mean that UK companies keep their events here, while others travel here while it's cheaper. "Conversely, the UK may now be considered a more cost-effective option for inbound events, explains Newton." Could Brexit mean the end for TOMS? The UK's exit from the EU could impact on the Tour Operators Margin Scheme (TOMS), the compulsory and unpopular margin accounting scheme for businesses buying in and recharging the cost of travel services, which UK event agencies have argued puts them at a competitive disadvantage. FMI Group group director John Fisher said in a post-referendum blog: "There will be no appetite to pursue UK event organisers who do not currently allow for TOMS as they can see it won’t apply in a few years’ time. So we may very well be going back to the old days of not charging VAT on overseas events in Europe which will make overseas events cheaper to run for UK operators going forward?" Article  written by Lauren Houghton and published in Citmagazine.com                    ...
Search
Receive our newsletter
Recently
MPI activities #IMEX17 in FrankfurtMeeting Professionals International (MPI) vision is to be the first choice for professional career development and...Read more
Best articles of the month
Women in Leadership: Interview with Isabel Bardinet, CEO of the European Society of Cardiology!It is a great honour to present you with the interview of one of the...Read more
MPI Turkey Chapter at Ace of Mice IstanbulMPI Turkey Chapter was among the exhibitors of the Ace of Mice by Turkish Airlines...Read more
Medical Meetings F&B – Food and Beverage, or Frustrate and Bewilder?The term F&B in the meetings industry refers to food and beverage. When it comes...Read more